• Lake Fryxell Facility Zone and surrounding area, Taylor Valley, Antarctica
  • False-color image from Titan Multi-Wave intensity, University of Houston
  • Dragon's Back Pressure Ridge, San Andreas Fault
  • Dune Fields near White Sands, New Mexico
  • Ancient Mayan settlement of Caracol, Belize

Welcome

The mission of the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) is to:

  • Provide research-quality airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) observations to the scientific community.
  • Advance the state of the art in airborne laser mapping.
  • Train and educate graduate students with knowledge of airborne mapping to meet the needs of academic institutions, government agencies, and private industry.

NCALM is based at the University of Houston and is operated in partnership with the University of California, Berkeley. The center is supported by the National Science Foundation and is associated with the multi-disciplinary Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences graduate program at the University of Houston.

News

Beyond Archaeology: NCALM Pursues New Technology, New Projects
September 20, 2018
Lidar Mapping Has Also Yielded Other Earth Science Discoveries   The National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping is best-known for its headline-grabbing work in archeology – the 2016...
Researchers with the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping used the center's lidar-equipped plane to map the permafrost in Antarctica.

Lidar Mapping Has Also Yielded Other Earth Science Discoveries

 

The National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping is best-known for its headline-grabbing work in archeology – the 2016 discovery of previously unknown ruins of a complex Maya settlement in the Guatemalan jungles, undocumented settlements from an ancient civilization in Honduras uncovered in 2012, and detailed mapping of more than a dozen other settlements in Mexico and Central America.

NCALM Invites Seed Project Proposals from Graduate Students
September 12, 2018
The National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping invites proposals from graduate students seeking airborne lidar data (up to 40 km2) for use in research toward an M.S. or Ph.D. degree. For...
NCALM Invites Seed Project Proposals from Graduate Students

The National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping invites proposals from graduate students seeking airborne lidar data (up to 40 km2) for use in research toward an M.S. or Ph.D. degree. For background information and a complete guideline for submitting a proposal, see the Seed Proposals and Format Guidelines pages. The proposal submission period is Thursday, September 13–Thursday, December 20, 2018. For more information, contact ncalm [at] egr.uh.edu (subject: Seed%20Project%20Proposal%20Information) or call (832) 842-8881.

Three New NCALM Datasets Released by OpenTopography
September 6, 2018
Three new datasets have been released by OpenTopography. The data were collected using an Optech Titan multispectral lidar and cover more than 270 km2. The projects' PIs were student seed...
Three New NCALM Datasets Released by OpenTopography

Three new datasets have been released by OpenTopography. The data were collected using an Optech Titan multispectral lidar and cover more than 270 km2. The projects' PIs were student seed proposal winners. Read more at opentopography.org.

UH Student Earns Top National Defense Science and Engineering Fellowship
August 17, 2018
Research Soaring to New Heights on the Tails of NASA Satellites   Andrea Albright, a graduate student in the Cullen College of Engineering’s geosensing systems engineering and sciences...
Andrea Albright, a UH grad student, is a 2018 National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellow.

Research Soaring to New Heights on the Tails of NASA Satellites

 

Andrea Albright, a graduate student in the Cullen College of Engineering’s geosensing systems engineering and sciences program, won a 2018 National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship. She is among 69 U.S. fellows chosen from more than 3,600 applicants.

Mission: Possible — Mapping Dangerous Terrain
August 8, 2018
UH Engineers Focus on Degradable Reconnaissance Vehicles and Evasive Drone Maneuvers   Ensuring military forces have up-to-date information about a potentially hostile region offers...
UH researchers are testing prototypes for the project in Brays Bayou.

UH Engineers Focus on Degradable Reconnaissance Vehicles and Evasive Drone Maneuvers

 

Ensuring military forces have up-to-date information about a potentially hostile region offers obvious advantages, but current methods for doing that – especially along shorelines, where underwater mines and other hazards can pose serious risks – all have drawbacks. It is especially difficult if keeping the technology out of enemy hands is a priority.