• Lake Fryxell Facility Zone and surrounding area, Taylor Valley, Antarctica
  • False-color image from Titan Multi-Wave intensity, University of Houston
  • Dragon's Back Pressure Ridge, San Andreas Fault
  • Dune Fields near White Sands, New Mexico
  • Ancient Mayan settlement of Caracol, Belize

Welcome

The mission of the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) is to:

  • Provide research-quality airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) observations to the scientific community.
  • Advance the state of the art in airborne laser mapping.
  • Train and educate graduate students with knowledge of airborne mapping to meet the needs of academic institutions, government agencies, and private industry.

NCALM is based at the University of Houston and is operated in partnership with the University of California, Berkeley. The center is supported by the National Science Foundation and is associated with the multi-disciplinary Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences graduate program at the University of Houston.

News

Geosensing Systems Engineering Seeks Postdoctoral Scholar
October 9, 2019
Postdoctoral Scholar Opening A postdoctoral position is available with the Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences program in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering...
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Houston

Postdoctoral Scholar Opening

A postdoctoral position is available with the Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences program in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at the University of Houston. The candidate will conduct research on quantifying 3D geospatial change between multi-temporal remote sensing data, including investigating new change detection approaches for point and raster data, applying rigorous uncertainty estimation, and developing new algorithms for adaptive and multiscale change detection methods. A Ph.D. in geomatics, geodetic science, remote sensing, computer vision or science, or related discipline is preferred. Experience with Python or MATLAB is required; experience with C++ is desirable. The successful applicant will be a part of a team of faculty members, research scientists, and graduate students focused on understanding our changing world through remote sensing observations. The program maintains a state-of-the-art facility and is associated with the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) funded by the NSF.

Interested parties should contact clglennie [at] uh.edu with a copy of their current CV.

Geosensing Systems Engineering Faculty Receives $400K Grant from NGA
October 7, 2019
Estimating the Uncertainty in Change-Detection Products will Advance the Geosciences Dr. Preston Hartzell received a $400,000 grant from the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA)....
Dr. Preston Hartzell, Research Assistant Professor at University of Houston

Estimating the Uncertainty in Change-Detection Products will Advance the Geosciences

Dr. Preston Hartzell received a $400,000 grant from the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). The new grant provides funding for two years. Preston is a Research Assistant Professor in the Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences graduate program at the University of Houston.

The NGA grant concentrates on developing rigorous methods for estimating the uncertainty in spatial change-detection products. Computing the vertical difference between pre- and post-event Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) to detect change is common, but producing a corresponding uncertainty estimate for each pixel of the difference model is rare. An analyst can observe vertical change but does not know if that change is significant under the current methods.

Preston's work aims to change that. He and others will develop algorithms to first estimate uncertainty in the source DEMs, followed by algorithms to push that source uncertainty into the final change detection product. They will also develop methods for estimating the uncertainty in horizontal motion derived from pre- and post-event point clouds and DEMs. This research will support scientists in properly interpreting and using spatial change-detection products by providing rigorously-derived uncertainty estimates for each reported change measurement.

Uncertainty estimation is fundamental to all measurement. Interpretation of a measurement requires familiarity with the complete measurement process in order to develop a sense of its reliability, given no associated uncertainty. "In terms of change detection, this is often overlooked when viewing a large change over a large area. But when examining small changes, such as horizontal motion due to post-seismic fault creep or a small, isolated area of vertical difference between two digital elevation models, an analyst should naturally question whether the reported spatial change is valid or simply a product of the data collection or processing methods," Preston states. "These small changes can be important, e.g., for earthquake inversion modeling or target detection."

Related News Stories:

www.egr.uh.edu/news/uh-engineers-test-biodegradable-self-guided-reconnaissance-devices

www.egr.uh.edu/news/uh-student-earns-top-national-defense-science-and-engineering-fellowship

UH Engineers Test Biodegradable Self-Guided Reconnaissance Devices
October 4, 2019
Researchers share video of their Advanced Naval Technology Exercise   Discretion is an integral part of covert reconnaissance missions. With that in mind, a team of UH Cullen College of...
UH ECE student Jarrett Lonsford works on the electronics for a sensing drift node in Dr. Aaron Becker's lab on Thursday, Oct. 3, 2019.

Researchers share video of their Advanced Naval Technology Exercise

 

Discretion is an integral part of covert reconnaissance missions. With that in mind, a team of UH Cullen College of Engineering researchers are working on $1 million project to create self-guided biodegradable containers of sensors to map coastlines and the bottom of the ocean. 

Geosensing Systems Engineering Seeks Tenure-Track Faculty
September 26, 2019
Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences Program Seeks Tenure-Track Faculty for Assistant or Associate Professor The Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE) at the...
University of Houston Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering

Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences Program Seeks Tenure-Track Faculty for Assistant or Associate Professor

The Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE) at the University of Houston invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track faculty position in the Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences (GSES) graduate program.

Applicant Qualifications: The applicant must have an earned Ph.D. in geomatics, geodetic science, or a related field of civil, environmental, aerospace, or mechanical engineering. A working knowledge and expertise in one or more remote sensing methods and instrument development is needed.

University and Department: The University of Houston is in a park-like campus a few minutes from downtown Houston, with over 37,000 undergraduate students and 8,000 graduate students. The CEE department currently has 20 tenured or tenure-track faculty members, with over 260 undergraduates and over 130 graduate students.

Read the full University of Houston job announcement and description here: Assistant or Associate Professor - Geosensing Systems Engineering - (FAC001129).

 

Apply Online

 

The University of Houston seeks to recruit and retain a diverse community of scholars. The University of Houston is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. The University of Houston is responsive to the needs of dual career couples.

Six New NCALM Datasets Released from California, Idaho, Washington, and Mexico
September 23, 2019
OpenTopography is pleased to announce the release of six new datasets covering areas of California, Idaho, Washington, and Mexico. Four of the six datasets were collected as part of NCALM's...
Hillshade of Goat Rocks, WA

OpenTopography is pleased to announce the release of six new datasets covering areas of California, Idaho, Washington, and Mexico. Four of the six datasets were collected as part of NCALM's seed grant program...

Continue reading at OpenTopography.org.