• Lake Fryxell Facility Zone and surrounding area, Taylor Valley, Antarctica
  • False-color image from Titan Multi-Wave intensity, University of Houston
  • Dragon's Back Pressure Ridge, San Andreas Fault
  • Dune Fields near White Sands, New Mexico
  • Ancient Mayan settlement of Caracol, Belize

Welcome

The mission of the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) is to:

  • Provide research-quality airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) observations to the scientific community.
  • Advance the state of the art in airborne laser mapping.
  • Train and educate graduate students with knowledge of airborne mapping to meet the needs of academic institutions, government agencies, and private industry.

NCALM is based at the University of Houston and is operated in partnership with the University of California, Berkeley. The center is supported by the National Science Foundation and is associated with the multi-disciplinary Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences graduate program at the University of Houston.

News

Houstonia Magazine Highlights Unique UH Research Center
May 4, 2018
Researchers Use Technology to Revolutionize Archaeology   In an article titled “This UH Research Center is Revolutionizing Archaeology,” Houstonia magazine shines the spotlight on...
 National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping/University of Houston Researchers Use Technology to Revolutionize Archaeology

 

In an article titled “This UH Research Center is Revolutionizing Archaeology,” Houstonia magazine shines the spotlight on University of Houston’s National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) and its director, Ramesh Shrestha. The two are responsible for unearthing archaeological treasures hidden for centuries.

New Ph.D. Student Opportunities in Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences
April 17, 2018
The Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences (GSES) graduate research program in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at the University of Houston, in conjunction...
New Ph.D. Student Opportunities in Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences

The Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences (GSES) graduate research program in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at the University of Houston, in conjunction with the NSF National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM), is seeking qualified applicants (with backgrounds in engineering, geomatics, geosciences, physics, astronomy, computer sciences, or geography) interested in: Design, development, and testing of lidar, digital image, and hyperspectral sensors; Research applications of lidar observations, including when combined with digital imagery or hyperspectral measurements; Study of satellite altimetry for applications in hydrology, glaciology, geodynamics, and sea levels; Applications of terrestrial laser scanning, airborne lidar, and GPS in natural hazards studies and mitigation; and Applications of airborne remote sensing techniques in geomorphology, climate/weather studies, hydrology, and tectonics. Please visit: ncalm.cive.uh.edu/gses/geosensing, for more information.

The application process and forms can be found on the Civil & Environmental Engineering website. Interested students can contact Dr. Craig Glennie at: clglennie [at] uh.edu (subject: Ph.D.%20Student%20Opportunity) .

Deadline: September 1st, 2018

UH Researchers Help Archaeologists Find the Remains of a Maya Megalopolis
February 6, 2018
Archaeologists and adventure junkies are buzzing about the announcement of previously unknown ruins of a complex Maya settlement hidden for centuries amidst the jungles of Guatemala.
 National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping/University of Houston

Archaeologists and adventure junkies are buzzing about the announcement of previously unknown ruins of a complex Maya settlement hidden for centuries amidst the jungles of Guatemala.

NCALM Announces 2017 Seed Proposal Winners
February 2, 2018
2017 Student Seed Proposal Winners Selected NCALM maps multiple project areas each year for graduate student PIs whose research would be enhanced by airborne lidar data and visible imagery...
NCALM Announces 2017 Seed Proposal Winners

2017 Student Seed Proposal Winners Selected

NCALM maps multiple project areas each year for graduate student PIs whose research would be enhanced by airborne lidar data and visible imagery. Students must write and submit a two page proposal to be considered for an award (details at: ncalm.cive.uh.edu/seed/about). The applications are reviewed by the NCALM Steering Committee, who then select winners based on intellectual merit and broader impact. Seed proposals that explore change detection by exploiting previously flown lidar coverage were encouraged this year.

NCALM would like to announce that the 2017 seed proposal winners have been awarded. There were 59 submissions, and eight projects were selected. Congratulations to the following students (and their advisors):

Madison Douglas (Michael Lamb) California Institute of TechnologyUsing meandering channels in Death Valley to determine the role of bank cohesion for unvegetated rivers on Earth and Mars

Scott Feehan (Scott McCoy) University of Nevada, RenoQuantifying the geomorphic effectiveness of paleo-outburst floods in the Truckee River Canyon

Kyle Hemes (Dennis Baldocchi) University of California, BerkeleyEcosystem structure as a driver of climatic, habitat, and hydrological services in heterogeneous restored wetlands

Colleen Murphy (Noah Finnegan) University of California, Santa CruzAlteration of groundwater flow due to slow landslide failure

Alexander Neely (Roman DiBiase) Pennsylvania State UniversityQuantifying rock strength controls on landscape morphology in the Guadalupe Mountains, NM/TX

Robert Sare (George Hilley) Stanford UniversityPoint classification using multispectral lidar and SfM for earthquake and volcano hazards applications

William Struble (Josh Roering) University of OregonControl of steepland landscape morphology by debris flows in the Idaho Batholith

Michael Vadman (Sean Bemis) Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityGenerating a decadal time-series of displacements near Parkfield, California, from 1929 to the present using change detection on lidar and historical aerial photographs

From High in the Sky Hyongki Lee and Ning Cao Monitor Water Storage Changes in Lower Mekong With Latest NASA Grant
January 11, 2018
One of the biggest challenges faced here on Earth – how to manage water resources for an ever-growing global population – may soon be solved more than 20,000 miles above our heads.
Professor Hyongki Lee (left) and postdoctoral researcher Ning Cao received funding from NASA to help build a sustainable system for water management in the lower Mekong region of Southeast Asia

One of the biggest challenges faced here on Earth – how to manage water resources for an ever-growing global population – may soon be solved more than 20,000 miles above our heads.