• Lake Fryxell Facility Zone and surrounding area, Taylor Valley, Antarctica
  • False-color image from Titan Multi-Wave intensity, University of Houston
  • Dragon's Back Pressure Ridge, San Andreas Fault
  • Dune Fields near White Sands, New Mexico
  • Ancient Mayan settlement of Caracol, Belize

Welcome

The mission of the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) is to:

  • Provide research-quality airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) observations to the scientific community.
  • Advance the state of the art in airborne laser mapping.
  • Train and educate graduate students with knowledge of airborne mapping to meet the needs of academic institutions, government agencies, and private industry.

NCALM is based at the University of Houston and is operated in partnership with the University of California, Berkeley. The center is supported by the National Science Foundation and is associated with the multi-disciplinary Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences graduate program at the University of Houston.

News

NCALM at 2019 AGU Fall Meeting
December 4, 2019
National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping/Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences Presentations and Posters at 2019 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting NCALM will be at the 2019...
National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping

National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping/Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences Presentations and Posters at 2019 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting

NCALM will be at the 2019 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting on Monday, December 9–Friday, December 13. Faculty, staff, and students will be available at Booth 311, shared with OpenTopograhpy, on "NSF Street."

Presentations:

Xinxiang Zhu, Craig Glennie, and Benjamin Brooks – NH14A-05: Automated Change Detection using Cylindrical Primitives Generated from a Deep Neural Network Monday, December 9, 2019, 17:00–17:15 Moscone West – 2016, L2

Preston Hartzell and Craig Glennie – NH14A-08: Rigorous Error Propagation for Topographic Displacements Derived from Image Correlation Monday, December 9, 2019, 17:45–18:00 Moscone West – 2016, L2

Posters:

M. Camille Barlow, Craig Glennie, Jennifer Telling, and Andrew Fountain – C31A-1480: Spatial Variability of Lateral Stream Channel Migration Over a Valley-Wide Scale: Taylor Valley, Antarctica Wednesday, December 11, 2019, 8:00–12:20 Moscone South – Poster Hall

Andrea Albright and Craig Glennie – C31C-1545: Investigation of ICESat-2 and Landsat/Sentinel-2 Imagery Fusion for Retrieval of Nearshore Bathymetry Wednesday, December 11, 2019, 8:00–12:20 Moscone South – Poster Hall

Kenneth Hudnut, Benjamin Brooks, Katherine Scharer, Janis Hernandez, Timothy Dawson, Michael Oskin, Ramon Arrowsmith, Kelly Ruth Blake, Stephan Bork, Matthew Boggs, Craig Glennie, Juan Carlos Fernandez-Diaz, Abhinav Singhania, and Darren Hauser – S31F-0466: Airborne Lidar and Electro-Optical Imagery Along Surface Ruptures of the 2019 Ridgecrest Earthquake Sequence, Southern California Wednesday, December 11, 2019, 8:00–12:20 Moscone South – Poster Hall

Three new NCALM datasets released from California and Mexico
November 14, 2019
OpenTopography is pleased to announce the release of three new datasets covering areas of California, and Mexico. Two of the three datasets were collected as part of NCALM's seed grant...
Truckee River Lidar DEM

OpenTopography is pleased to announce the release of three new datasets covering areas of California, and Mexico. Two of the three datasets were collected as part of NCALM's seed grant program...

Continue reading at OpenTopography.

A Collaboration of Satellites and Villages
November 5, 2019
UH Professor Continues Work With NASA and Mekong River Stakeholders To Address Flooding and Other Critical Issues Hyongki Lee, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at...
Hyongki Lee, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at the UH Cullen College of Engineering, is working on his second NASA SERVIR project.

UH Professor Continues Work With NASA and Mekong River Stakeholders To Address Flooding and Other Critical Issues

Hyongki Lee, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at the UH Cullen College of Engineering, has a lot of experience using data collected by Earth-observing technologies (such as satellites) for solving water management issues on Earth.

With his latest grant, Lee is diving deeper into addressing critical concerns such as land subsidence, flood forecasting and groundwater management in the Mekong region of Southeast Asia.

Principal investigator Lee and his co-investigator Faisal Hossain of the University of Washington recently won their second NASA SERVIR program grant. The three-year project, titled "Operational Services for water, disaster and hydropower applications for lower Mekong populations using NASA earth observations and models," received $661,443 in funding...

Continue reading at www.egr.uh.edu.

Donghwan Kim Defends Ph.D. Dissertation
November 4, 2019
River Discharge Estimates Improved Using Ensemble Learning Ph.D. candidate Donghwan Kim successfully defended his dissertation titled, "Ensemble Learning Regression for Estimating River...
Donghwan Kim Defends Ph.D. Dissertation

River Discharge Estimates Improved Using Ensemble Learning

Ph.D. candidate Donghwan Kim successfully defended his dissertation titled, "Ensemble Learning Regression for Estimating River Discharge Using Remotely Sensed Data and Hydrological Model." A new approach to estimating river discharge using ensemble learning regression (ELQ) was developed. Ensemble learning designates a series of procedures to train several functions and combine their results based on an integrating rule. ELQ generates more accurate estimates of river discharge compared to those obtained from traditional empirical methods. Efforts were also made to improve the accuracy of estimates of discharge for poorly gauged rivers using remotely sensed data, hydrologic models, and ELQ.

Donghwan's Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences (GSES) advisor was Dr. Hyongki Lee. Congratulations, Donghwan!

Related News Stories:

ncalm.cive.uh.edu/news/zhiyue-sun-defends-phd-dissertation

ncalm.cive.uh.edu/news/ekhtari-defends-phd-dissertation

NCALM Announces 2020 Mexico and Central America Airborne Lidar Collection Campaign
November 4, 2019
Mexico and Central America Airborne Lidar Collection Campaign for Small- and Medium-Sized Projects The National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping is announcing a call for expressions of...
Teotihuacan Intensity Overlay

Mexico and Central America Airborne Lidar Collection Campaign for Small- and Medium-Sized Projects

The National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping is announcing a call for expressions of interest from researchers with small- to medium-sized projects and budgets in Mexico and Central America for Spring 2020 (March–April). NCALM has received numerous inquiries from researchers with small projects in Mexico and Central America over the years. The size of these projects and their associated budgets make them economically and practically unfeasible. It is possible to survey small projects, and bring large benefits to the broader community, if several small projects within a country or region are grouped together and the mobilization costs are distributed. Project mobilization is also aided by larger projects funded by other sources. NCALM mapped seven small archaeological projects last year for the 2019 Mexico and Central America Lidar Collection Campaign. The work included projects in Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and El Salvador.

NCALM has initially received expressions of interest for areas in Mexico, Belize, and Honduras. We are looking for additional projects to complement these sites. The smallest individual project budget that will be considered is $15,000. Exact coverage will be determined based on collection density, distance to airports, neighboring projects, and other factors. Send a short description of your project, potential budget, and KMZ of your area of interest if you have interest in participating in a community collection campaign. Projects must be research focused and can include, but are not limited to, archaeology, geology, hydrology, seismology, and ecology.

Please contact us for more information about the campaign and forward this announcement to other researchers that may have an interest in such data collection. The more projects that are organized together, the larger the areas that can be collected for individual projects. NCALM will start data collection in March–April 2020. We will begin requesting permits to fly and collect data for the respective countries in January 2020.

Contact NCALM at ncalm [at] egr.uh.edu (subject: 2020%20MXCA%20Lidar%20Collection%20Campaign) for more information.

Notes:

    NCALM is not providing the budget or funds to perform mapping. We are organizing a campaign to optimize the funds researchers currently have or can obtain. If you are interested in pursuing cooperative work, please send NCALM a response that includes a KMZ of your study area, a one-to-two paragraph description of you research objectives, and a budget of your potentially available funds. NCALM will work with PIs to develop a plan to allow data collection in their focus area. Please provide NCALM with information regarding contacts that you have in the foreign country and locale of interest and current work permits that you have obtained. NCALM is required to have varying permits to perform flights or work in specific areas, depending on the country.

Deadlines:

    NCALM is requesting a preliminary commitment by Monday, January 6, 2020, so we can begin the paperwork and preparation of export licenses and permits to the various countries. A final commitment and confirmation of funds will be requested by Friday, February 14, 2020, so the mapping campaign can be executed during March–April 2020.