News

A Collaboration of Satellites and Villages
November 5, 2019
UH Professor Continues Work With NASA and Mekong River Stakeholders To Address Flooding and Other Critical Issues Hyongki Lee, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at...
Hyongki Lee, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at the UH Cullen College of Engineering, is working on his second NASA SERVIR project.

UH Professor Continues Work With NASA and Mekong River Stakeholders To Address Flooding and Other Critical Issues

Hyongki Lee, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at the UH Cullen College of Engineering, has a lot of experience using data collected by Earth-observing technologies (such as satellites) for solving water management issues on Earth.

With his latest grant, Lee is diving deeper into addressing critical concerns such as land subsidence, flood forecasting and groundwater management in the Mekong region of Southeast Asia.

Principal investigator Lee and his co-investigator Faisal Hossain of the University of Washington recently won their second NASA SERVIR program grant. The three-year project, titled "Operational Services for water, disaster and hydropower applications for lower Mekong populations using NASA earth observations and models," received $661,443 in funding...

Continue reading at www.egr.uh.edu.

Donghwan Kim Defends Ph.D. Dissertation
November 4, 2019
River Discharge Estimates Improved Using Ensemble Learning Ph.D. candidate Donghwan Kim successfully defended his dissertation titled, "Ensemble Learning Regression for Estimating River...
Donghwan Kim Defends Ph.D. Dissertation

River Discharge Estimates Improved Using Ensemble Learning

Ph.D. candidate Donghwan Kim successfully defended his dissertation titled, "Ensemble Learning Regression for Estimating River Discharge Using Remotely Sensed Data and Hydrological Model." A new approach to estimating river discharge using ensemble learning regression (ELQ) was developed. Ensemble learning designates a series of procedures to train several functions and combine their results based on an integrating rule. ELQ generates more accurate estimates of river discharge compared to those obtained from traditional empirical methods. Efforts were also made to improve the accuracy of estimates of discharge for poorly gauged rivers using remotely sensed data, hydrologic models, and ELQ.

Donghwan's Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences (GSES) advisor was Dr. Hyongki Lee. Congratulations, Donghwan!

Related News Stories:

ncalm.cive.uh.edu/news/zhiyue-sun-defends-phd-dissertation

ncalm.cive.uh.edu/news/ekhtari-defends-phd-dissertation

NCALM Announces 2020 Mexico and Central America Airborne Lidar Collection Campaign
November 4, 2019
Mexico and Central America Airborne Lidar Collection Campaign for Small- and Medium-Sized Projects The National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping is announcing a call for expressions of...
Teotihuacan Intensity Overlay

Mexico and Central America Airborne Lidar Collection Campaign for Small- and Medium-Sized Projects

The National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping is announcing a call for expressions of interest from researchers with small- to medium-sized projects and budgets in Mexico and Central America for Spring 2020 (March–April). NCALM has received numerous inquiries from researchers with small projects in Mexico and Central America over the years. The size of these projects and their associated budgets make them economically and practically unfeasible. It is possible to survey small projects, and bring large benefits to the broader community, if several small projects within a country or region are grouped together and the mobilization costs are distributed. Project mobilization is also aided by larger projects funded by other sources. NCALM mapped seven small archaeological projects last year for the 2019 Mexico and Central America Lidar Collection Campaign. The work included projects in Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and El Salvador.

NCALM has initially received expressions of interest for areas in Mexico, Belize, and Honduras. We are looking for additional projects to complement these sites. The smallest individual project budget that will be considered is $15,000. Exact coverage will be determined based on collection density, distance to airports, neighboring projects, and other factors. Send a short description of your project, potential budget, and KMZ of your area of interest if you have interest in participating in a community collection campaign. Projects must be research focused and can include, but are not limited to, archaeology, geology, hydrology, seismology, and ecology.

Please contact us for more information about the campaign and forward this announcement to other researchers that may have an interest in such data collection. The more projects that are organized together, the larger the areas that can be collected for individual projects. NCALM will start data collection in March–April 2020. We will begin requesting permits to fly and collect data for the respective countries in January 2020.

Contact NCALM at ncalm [at] egr.uh.edu (subject: 2020%20MXCA%20Lidar%20Collection%20Campaign) for more information.

Notes:

    NCALM is not providing the budget or funds to perform mapping. We are organizing a campaign to optimize the funds researchers currently have or can obtain. If you are interested in pursuing cooperative work, please send NCALM a response that includes a KMZ of your study area, a one-to-two paragraph description of you research objectives, and a budget of your potentially available funds. NCALM will work with PIs to develop a plan to allow data collection in their focus area. Please provide NCALM with information regarding contacts that you have in the foreign country and locale of interest and current work permits that you have obtained. NCALM is required to have varying permits to perform flights or work in specific areas, depending on the country.

Deadlines:

    NCALM is requesting a preliminary commitment by Monday, January 6, 2020, so we can begin the paperwork and preparation of export licenses and permits to the various countries. A final commitment and confirmation of funds will be requested by Friday, February 14, 2020, so the mapping campaign can be executed during March–April 2020.
Geosensing Systems Engineering Seeks Postdoctoral Scholar
October 9, 2019
Postdoctoral Scholar Opening A postdoctoral position is available with the Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences program in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering...
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Houston

Postdoctoral Scholar Opening

A postdoctoral position is available with the Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences program in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at the University of Houston. The candidate will conduct research on quantifying 3D geospatial change between multi-temporal remote sensing data, including investigating new change detection approaches for point and raster data, applying rigorous uncertainty estimation, and developing new algorithms for adaptive and multiscale change detection methods. A Ph.D. in geomatics, geodetic science, remote sensing, computer vision or science, or related discipline is preferred. Experience with Python or MATLAB is required; experience with C++ is desirable. The successful applicant will be a part of a team of faculty members, research scientists, and graduate students focused on understanding our changing world through remote sensing observations. The program maintains a state-of-the-art facility and is associated with the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) funded by the NSF.

Interested parties should contact clglennie [at] uh.edu with a copy of their current CV.

Geosensing Systems Engineering Faculty Receives $400K Grant from NGA
October 7, 2019
Estimating the Uncertainty in Change-Detection Products will Advance the Geosciences Dr. Preston Hartzell received a $400,000 grant from the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA)....
Dr. Preston Hartzell, Research Assistant Professor at University of Houston

Estimating the Uncertainty in Change-Detection Products will Advance the Geosciences

Dr. Preston Hartzell received a $400,000 grant from the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). The new grant provides funding for two years. Preston is a Research Assistant Professor in the Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences graduate program at the University of Houston.

The NGA grant concentrates on developing rigorous methods for estimating the uncertainty in spatial change-detection products. Computing the vertical difference between pre- and post-event Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) to detect change is common, but producing a corresponding uncertainty estimate for each pixel of the difference model is rare. An analyst can observe vertical change but does not know if that change is significant under the current methods.

Preston's work aims to change that. He and others will develop algorithms to first estimate uncertainty in the source DEMs, followed by algorithms to push that source uncertainty into the final change detection product. They will also develop methods for estimating the uncertainty in horizontal motion derived from pre- and post-event point clouds and DEMs. This research will support scientists in properly interpreting and using spatial change-detection products by providing rigorously-derived uncertainty estimates for each reported change measurement.

Uncertainty estimation is fundamental to all measurement. Interpretation of a measurement requires familiarity with the complete measurement process in order to develop a sense of its reliability, given no associated uncertainty. "In terms of change detection, this is often overlooked when viewing a large change over a large area. But when examining small changes, such as horizontal motion due to post-seismic fault creep or a small, isolated area of vertical difference between two digital elevation models, an analyst should naturally question whether the reported spatial change is valid or simply a product of the data collection or processing methods," Preston states. "These small changes can be important, e.g., for earthquake inversion modeling or target detection."

Related News Stories:

www.egr.uh.edu/news/uh-engineers-test-biodegradable-self-guided-reconnaissance-devices

www.egr.uh.edu/news/uh-student-earns-top-national-defense-science-and-engineering-fellowship

UH Engineers Test Biodegradable Self-Guided Reconnaissance Devices
October 4, 2019
Researchers share video of their Advanced Naval Technology Exercise   Discretion is an integral part of covert reconnaissance missions. With that in mind, a team of UH Cullen College of...
UH ECE student Jarrett Lonsford works on the electronics for a sensing drift node in Dr. Aaron Becker's lab on Thursday, Oct. 3, 2019.

Researchers share video of their Advanced Naval Technology Exercise

 

Discretion is an integral part of covert reconnaissance missions. With that in mind, a team of UH Cullen College of Engineering researchers are working on $1 million project to create self-guided biodegradable containers of sensors to map coastlines and the bottom of the ocean. 

Geosensing Systems Engineering Seeks Tenure-Track Faculty
September 26, 2019
Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences Program Seeks Tenure-Track Faculty for Assistant or Associate Professor The Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE) at the...
University of Houston Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering

Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences Program Seeks Tenure-Track Faculty for Assistant or Associate Professor

The Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE) at the University of Houston invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track faculty position in the Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences (GSES) graduate program.

Applicant Qualifications: The applicant must have an earned Ph.D. in geomatics, geodetic science, or a related field of civil, environmental, aerospace, or mechanical engineering. A working knowledge and expertise in one or more remote sensing methods and instrument development is needed.

University and Department: The University of Houston is in a park-like campus a few minutes from downtown Houston, with over 37,000 undergraduate students and 8,000 graduate students. The CEE department currently has 20 tenured or tenure-track faculty members, with over 260 undergraduates and over 130 graduate students.

Read the full University of Houston job announcement and description here: Assistant or Associate Professor - Geosensing Systems Engineering - (FAC001129).

 

Apply Online

 

The University of Houston seeks to recruit and retain a diverse community of scholars. The University of Houston is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. The University of Houston is responsive to the needs of dual career couples.

Six New NCALM Datasets Released from California, Idaho, Washington, and Mexico
September 23, 2019
OpenTopography is pleased to announce the release of six new datasets covering areas of California, Idaho, Washington, and Mexico. Four of the six datasets were collected as part of NCALM's...
Hillshade of Goat Rocks, WA

OpenTopography is pleased to announce the release of six new datasets covering areas of California, Idaho, Washington, and Mexico. Four of the six datasets were collected as part of NCALM's seed grant program...

Continue reading at OpenTopography.org.

NCALM Invites Seed Proposals for Graduate Student Research
September 13, 2019
The National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping invites proposals from graduate students seeking airborne lidar data (up to 40 sq km) for use in research toward an M.S. or Ph.D. degree. See...
National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping

The National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping invites proposals from graduate students seeking airborne lidar data (up to 40 sq km) for use in research toward an M.S. or Ph.D. degree. See NCALM's Seed Proposals and Format Guidelines pages for background information and instructions on submitting a proposal. The submission period is Monday, September 16–Friday, December 20, 2019. Contact ncalm [at] egr.uh.edu for more information.

Small Projects Mapped through Community Resource Pooling
August 15, 2019
Eight and a half weeks out of the country was one of NCALM's longest campaigns. The National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping field team mapped seven small archaeological projects for the...
Flying over Metzabok, Mexico.

Eight and a half weeks out of the country was one of NCALM's longest campaigns. The National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping field team mapped seven small archaeological projects for the 2019 Mexico and Central America Lidar Collection Campaign for Small- and Medium-Sized Projects during that time. The work included three projects in Belize, two in Guatemala, one in Mexico, and one in El Salvador. The trip was NCALM's first time in El Salvador. It was the first time airborne lidar was used for archaeology in the country and was for the National Archaeological Foundation of El Salvador (FUNDAR). A special thanks to Juan Carlos Fernandez Diaz, Abhinav Singhania, Darren Hauser, Sven Sorhus, Jordan Laughlin, pilot Robert Chalender, aircraft provider Marc, Inc., Teledyne Optech, and the principal investigators and their local contacts for helping NCALM successfully complete the small projects and other work in Mexico and Central America. Data processing is underway.

FUNDAR Press Conference

The "small- and medium-sized projects" campaign objective is to combine resources from multiple small projects. The projects are then economically feasible. This year's projects were also aided by several larger projects funded by the NSF and other sources.

NCALM is looking ahead to next year, because there is already interest from various project coordinators in Mexico and Central America. An announcement and planning has not begun, but general inquires can be sent to ncalm [at] egr.uh.edu (subject: 2020%20MXCA%20Campaign) . Follow @NCALM_UH on Twitter for more updates.

NCALM crew setting up a GPS

NCALM crew flying in a Navajo

Related News Stories:

www.laprensagrafica.com/cultura/Mapeo-lidar-en-tres-sitios-arqueologicos

ncalm.cive.uh.edu/news/field-update-2019-mexico-and-central-america-lidar

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