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Hyongki Lee’s Plan to Monitor Water is Out of This World
July 25, 2016
If it has to do with water, you can bet Assistant Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor Hyongki Lee has an appetite whet for it. Fresh off the success of helping Pakistani officials...
Professor Hyongki Lee is helping manage water via satellite for Indochina

If it has to do with water, you can bet Assistant Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor Hyongki Lee has an appetite whet for it. Fresh off the success of helping Pakistani officials manage water resources, he’s at it again, now selected by NASA to manage water for Indochina.

For Lee, it’s an issue of fairness.

GSES Ph.D. Student Defends Dissertation
June 22, 2016
Zhigang Pan defended his Ph.D. dissertation, "Shallow Water Bathymetry Using Full Waveform Bathymetric LiDAR and Hyperspectral Imagery." High-resolution airborne hyperspectral imagery and...
Zhigang Pan Defends Dissertation

Zhigang Pan defended his Ph.D. dissertation, "Shallow Water Bathymetry Using Full Waveform Bathymetric LiDAR and Hyperspectral Imagery." High-resolution airborne hyperspectral imagery and high-resolution, low-pulse energy, full waveform lidar were investigated to determine their capabilities for predicting water column characteristics and bathymetry. Using multiple evaluations, significant improvements in point density, multiple return detection, water turbidity, and accuracy were determined for full waveform bathymetric lidar. Additionally, improvements were made to the determination of shallow water bathymetry, water turbidity, and water column constituent concentration using hyperspectral imagery.

Zhigang becomes the fifth Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences (GSES) doctoral student to defend in 2016. His advisor was Dr. Craig Glennie. Zhigang will be working closely with Dr. Glennie and Leica Geosystems as a postdoctoral researcher, where he will be concentrating on single photon lidar calibration and filtering.

Congratulations, Zhigang!

2014 Titan Point Clouds Now Available
June 16, 2016
Seven new NCALM lidar datasets are now available on OpenTopograpy. These point clouds were among the first collected by the Optech Titan in 2014. The datasets, which were CZO and SEED...
2014 Titan Point Clouds Now Available

Seven new NCALM lidar datasets are now available on OpenTopograpy. These point clouds were among the first collected by the Optech Titan in 2014. The datasets, which were CZO and SEED projects, are located in California, Montana, South Carolina, Utah, and Wyoming. Lidar data can be found here.

GSES Doctoral Candidate Successfully Defends Dissertation
May 27, 2016
Doctoral student Hongzhou Wang, from the Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences (GSES) graduate studies program, recently defended his dissertation on, “Fusion of Full Waveform LiDAR...
GSES Doctoral Candidate Successfully Defends Dissertation

Doctoral student Hongzhou Wang, from the Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences (GSES) graduate studies program, recently defended his dissertation on, “Fusion of Full Waveform LiDAR and Passive Remote Sensing for Improved Land-Cover Classification.” Land cover classification is a crucial step in interpreting remote sensing data, and the accuracy of the classification determines the reliability of the product for further downstream applications. Hyperspectral sensors have been widely utilized for classification because of the discrimination afforded by their rich spectral information and high resolution in both the spatial and spectral domains. Additionally, lidar data has gained increased interest for use in classification, because it provides precise 3D data with information regarding target backscattering properties. With the introduction of full waveform lidar (FWL), the possibility of using lidar for target discrimination has been enhanced due to the additional structural information acquired. The geometrical information and backscattering properties measured by FWL is complementary to the reflectance characteristics recorded within hyperspectral imagery (HI). The fusion of FWL and HI is, consequently, desirable. Hongzhou’s research aimed to build a framework for fusing FWL and HI while demonstrating the application of combined datasets for land cover classification. Feature extraction methods and classifier designs were proposed after considering characteristics of both datasets, and performance of the proposed methods were evaluated. Experimental results showed that the suggested methods were successful in extracting features from reconstructed FWL data.

Hongzhou has accepted a position at CGG as a Seismic Imager. Dr. Craig Glennie was Hongzhou’s graduate advisor. Congratulations and good luck!

NCALM/GSES Hires New Research Professor
May 25, 2016
Dr. Preston Hartzell joins NCALM and the Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences faculty as a Research Assistant Professor. Preston earned his Ph.D. (2016) from University of Houston...
Dr. Preston Hartzell

Dr. Preston Hartzell joins NCALM and the Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences faculty as a Research Assistant Professor. Preston earned his Ph.D. (2016) from University of Houston and his B.S. (2004) from Pennsylvania State University. His doctoral dissertation focused on using terrestrial laser scanning intensity to enhance terrestrial hyperspectral image shadow restoration.

Preston will be working closely with Dr. Craig Glennie and the USACE Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory on related work in instrument and data calibration and multi-instrument integration.

GSES Doctoral Candidate Defends Dissertation
April 25, 2016
A Ph.D. student from the Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences (GSES) graduate research program successfully defended his dissertation. Ning Cao defended on, “Advanced SAR...
GSES Doctoral Candidate Defends Dissertation

A Ph.D. student from the Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences (GSES) graduate research program successfully defended his dissertation. Ning Cao defended on, “Advanced SAR Interferometry Methods for Ground Displacement Estimation from Spaceborne and Airborne Platforms.” Ground deformation measurements are important for monitoring and improving understanding of many natural geological phenomena or human-induced events, such as earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, and land subsidence. Therefore, ground deformation studies can provide critical information for disaster prevention and protection of people and property. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is a powerful technique for monitoring ground deformation phenomena.

In Ning's dissertation, several problems with the current advanced InSAR techniques were expressed, and corresponding approaches were proposed to solve them. He mainly focused on studying subsidence and landslide phenomena, producing results that can be used to monitor land subsidence in high spatial and temporal resolutions and to assess the impacts on civil infrastructure. The research also improves understanding of landslides to provide critical predictions and warnings.

Ning will be working as a postdoctoral researcher with NCALM/GSES at the University of Houston. Ning’s advisor was Dr. Hyongki Lee.

Congratulations, Ning!

Two GSES Ph.D. Candidates Defend Their Dissertations
April 7, 2016
Two students from the Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences (GSES) graduate program recently defended their Ph.D. dissertations. Preston Hartzell defended on, "Active and Passive...
Two GSES Ph.D. Candidates Defend Their Dissertations

Two students from the Geosensing Systems Engineering & Sciences (GSES) graduate program recently defended their Ph.D. dissertations. Preston Hartzell defended on, "Active and Passive Sensor Fusion for Terrestrial Hyperspectral Image Shadow Detection and Restoration." The dissertation broke new ground in the application of radiometrically calibrated laser scanning intensity for enhancing existing and new shadow restoration techniques within fused hyperspectral imagery. The developed techniques demonstrated sub-pixel image shadow detection and enabled accurate recovery of spectral information within shadowed areas for improved image classification results. The work extends the value of terrestrial laser scanning information in sensor fusion applications beyond the currently employed spatial dimension into the spectral domain.

Xiao Zhang defended on, "Lidar Based Change Detection for Earthquake Surface Ruptures." Significant damage due to earthquakes, coupled with poor comprehension of the mechanism of earthquake surface ruptures, requires the ability to rapidly characterize 3D deformation over large areas to study stress change on faults and after-slip activity. Earlier studies showed the potential of obtaining displacement fields by differencing repeat lidar scans; however, the overall methodology has not received sufficient attention, and optimal methods of estimating 3D displacement from airborne laser scanning were needed. In Xiao's dissertation, a new solution, the Anisotropic Iterative Closest Point (A-ICP) algorithm, and a new partition scheme known as a “moving window,” with the innovate use of anthropogenic features, were proposed to handle the large spatial scale point cloud coverage and to deliver local, varying surface deformation near the fault, while overcoming the difficulties associated with sparse legacy pre-event datasets.

Preston has accepted a position as a Research Assistant Professor in the GSES program, at the University of Houston, where he will be continuing his work in sensor fusion and error modeling. Xiao will be working for the Shell Exploration and Production Company, in Houston, TX, as a Geomatics Specialist. Dr. Craig Glennie was advisor to both students.

Congratulations, Preston and Xiao!  

Postdoctoral Researcher Joins NCALM/GSES Team
April 6, 2016
Dr. Jennifer Telling recently joined the NCALM/GSES team as a postdoctoral researcher. She graduated in 2013, from the Georgia Institute of Technology, with a Ph.D. in Earth &...
Postdoctoral Researcher Joins NCALM/GSES Team

Dr. Jennifer Telling recently joined the NCALM/GSES team as a postdoctoral researcher. She graduated in 2013, from the Georgia Institute of Technology, with a Ph.D. in Earth & Atmospheric Sciences. At Georgia Tech, her concentration was in geophysics and volcanology, with a minor in atmospheric science. Jennifer’s areas of interest in research include geophysics, volcanology, hazard modeling, planetary science, and image analysis. She is interested in “any work that allows me to combine techniques from different fields” of study. Previously, she completed a two-year postdoc in volcano remote sensing at Michigan Technological University.

We would like to welcome Jennifer to our team of researchers and students!

NCALM Announces 2015 Seed Proposal Winners
March 23, 2016
The 2015 winners of NCALM's seed proposal program have been selected. Seven students will have their projects mapped by NCALM. Congratulations to the winners and their advisors! Read the...
NCALM Announces 2015 Seed Proposal Winners

The 2015 winners of NCALM's seed proposal program have been selected. Seven students will have their projects mapped by NCALM. Congratulations to the winners and their advisors! Read the full announcement here.

UH Engineer Helps Pakistan Officials Manage Water Resources with NASA’s Satellite Data
February 29, 2016
Using data collected from twin NASA satellites, a UH engineering professor is helping officials from the Pakistan Council of Research in Water Resources (PCRWR) to manage the country’s...

Using data collected from twin NASA satellites, a UH engineering professor is helping officials from the Pakistan Council of Research in Water Resources (PCRWR) to manage the country’s groundwater resources from approximately 300 miles above Earth.

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